30 Days of Mental Health
Throughout The Academic Year

As stated by the American Psychological Association, the National Association of School Psychologists, the National Education Association, and others: addressing mental health must become a priority in our schools, for students and for educators.

When full in-person learning resumes, academic accountability pressures will focus our energies on academic content and toward maximizing instructional time. Because most children and youth may not display outward signs of distress, we may assume that we can quickly move on from the trauma of the pandemic. However, we must remember that society has taught us to act as if everything is OK even when it isn’t. As we work toward promoting academic success, let's be sure to place equal focus on the social, emotional, and mental health needs of all the members of our school communities. 

Understanding the A-B-Cs of mental health and illness is the first step to improving children's outcomes. Therefore, we are asking educators, parents, and caregivers to pledge to engage in 30 days of child and youth mental health during the academic year. Schools can be the place where we destigmatize mental illness and teach children and youth how to foster mental health. 

30 Days of Mental Health campaign goals:

  • To keep students' mental health at the forefront of our minds throughout the academic year.

  • To remind educators, parents, and caregivers that recovery from trauma takes time.

  • ​To ensure that educators, parents, and caregivers have the knowledge and tools to promote positive mental health. 

 

EDUCATOR PLEDGE

30 Days Pledge (1).png

Step 1: Sign the pledge here.

 

Step 2: Post the pledge card that you will receive via email on your door, chalkboard, or any other central place in your classroom.

 

Step 3: Post a picture of yourself with the pledge card on your social media and invite others to join the commitment to promote positive mental health and healing from trauma with the hashtag  #30DaysOfMentalHealth.

Step 4: Check your inbox for a resource guide on how to talk with students about mental health and mental illness.  

Step 5: You will receive access to 30 mental health lessons that can be adapted for a broad range of grades. 

We aim to increase the likelihood that educators will integrate mental health lessons into each day by providing brief lessons that can be adapted for a broad range of grades.

 

PARENT/CAREGIVER PLEDGE

30 Days Pledge (3).png

Step 1: Sign the pledge here.

Step 2: Post the pledge card that you will receive via email on your fridge, door, mirror, or any other central place in your home.

 

Step 3: Post a picture of yourself with the pledge card on your social media and invite others to join the commitment to promote positive mental health and healing from trauma with the hashtag  #30DaysOfMentalHealth.

Step 4: Check your inbox for a guide with tips on how to talk with children about mental health and mental illness, and links to a range of mental health digital books that you can choose from to read with children.

Step 5: You will receive access to 30 mental health conversation starters.

We aim to increase the likelihood that parents and caregivers will talk with children about mental health by providing a daily conversation starter.

 

Effects of the pandemic on teen mental health from a national poll conducted by C.S. Mott Children's Hospital

Effects of pandemic on teen mental health

Day 1

What is mental health and wellness?

Day
2

What is mental illness?

Day 6

Stress: What is it?

Who has mental health and illness?

Day
3

Day 4

Yes, the pandemic is impacting mental health

Day
5

Am I angry, sad, hurt, frustrated, or ...?

Day
7

Stress: Where does it come from?

Day
8

GET HELP: How to share your stress with an adult

You got this:

Self-advocating for stress reduction

Day 9

Day
10

Making peace with all that has been lost to the pandemic

Day 11

Adverse life experiences and feelings of shame and self-blame

Day
12

To share

or overshare?

Day
13

Shining light on shame